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Advanced forms

Overview

Filament Form Builder are designed to be flexible and customizable. Many existing form builders allow users to define a form schema, but don't provide a great interface for defining inter-field interactions, or custom logic. Since all Filament forms are built on top of Livewire, the form can adapt dynamically to user input, even after it has been initially rendered. Developers can use parameter injection to access many utilities in real time and build dynamic forms based on user input. The lifecycle of fields is open to extension using hook functions to define custom functionality for each field. This allows developers to build complex forms with ease.

The basics of reactivity

Livewire is a tool that allows Blade-rendered HTML to dynamically re-render without requiring a full page reload. Filament forms are built on top of Livewire, so they are able to re-render dynamically, allowing their layout to adapt after they are initially rendered.

By default, when a user uses a field, the form will not re-render. Since rendering requires a round-trip to the server, this is a performance optimization. However, if you wish to re-render the form after the user has interacted with a field, you can use the live() method:

use Filament\Forms\Components\Select;
 
Select::make('status')
->options([
'draft' => 'Draft',
'reviewing' => 'Reviewing',
'published' => 'Published',
])
->live()

In this example, when the user changes the value of the status field, the form will re-render. This allows you to then make changes to fields in the form based on the new value of the status field. Also, you can hook in to the field's lifecycle to perform custom logic when the field is updated.

Reactive fields on blur

By default, when a field is set to live(), the form will re-render every time the field is interacted with. However, this may not be appropriate for some fields like the text input, since making network requests while the user is still typing results in suboptimal performance. You may wish to re-render the form only after the user has finished using the field, when it becomes out of focus. You can do this using the live(onBlur: true) method:

use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
 
TextInput::make('username')
->live(onBlur: true)

Debouncing reactive fields

You may wish to find a middle ground between live() and live(onBlur: true), using "debouncing". Debouncing will prevent a network request from being sent until a user has finished typing for a certain period of time. You can do this using the live(debounce: 500) method:

use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
 
TextInput::make('username')
->live(debounce: 500) // Wait 500ms before re-rendering the form.

In this example, 500 is the number of milliseconds to wait before sending a network request. You can customize this number to whatever you want, or even use a string like '1s'.

Form component utility injection

The vast majority of methods used to configure fields and layout components accept functions as parameters instead of hardcoded values:

use App\Models\User;
use Filament\Forms\Components\DatePicker;
use Filament\Forms\Components\Select;
use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
 
DatePicker::make('date_of_birth')
->displayFormat(function () {
if (auth()->user()->country_id === 'us') {
return 'm/d/Y'
} else {
return 'd/m/Y'
}
})
 
Select::make('user_id')
->options(function () {
return User::all()->pluck('name', 'id');
})
 
TextInput::make('middle_name')
->required(fn (): bool => auth()->user()->hasMiddleName())

This alone unlocks many customization possibilities.

The package is also able to inject many utilities to use inside these functions, as parameters. All customization methods that accept functions as arguments can inject utilities.

These injected utilities require specific parameter names to be used. Otherwise, Filament doesn't know what to inject.

Injecting the current state of a field

If you wish to access the current state (value) of the field, define a $state parameter:

function ($state) {
// ...
}

Injecting the current form component instance

If you wish to access the current component instance, define a $component parameter:

use Filament\Forms\Components\Component;
 
function (Component $component) {
// ...
}

Injecting the current Livewire component instance

If you wish to access the current Livewire component instance, define a $livewire parameter:

use Livewire\Component as Livewire;
 
function (Livewire $livewire) {
// ...
}

Injecting the current form record

If your form is associated with an Eloquent model instance, define a $record parameter:

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;
 
function (?Model $record) {
// ...
}

Injecting the state of another field

You may also retrieve the state (value) of another field from within a callback, using a $get parameter:

use Filament\Forms\Get;
 
function (Get $get) {
$email = $get('email'); // Store the value of the `email` field in the `$email` variable.
//...
}

Injecting a function to set the state of another field

In a similar way to $get, you may also set the value of another field from within a callback, using a $set parameter:

use Filament\Forms\Set;
 
function (Set $set) {
$set('title', 'Blog Post'); // Set the `title` field to `Blog Post`.
//...
}

When this function is run, the state of the title field will be updated, and the form will re-render with the new title. This is useful inside the afterStateUpdated method.

Injecting the current form operation

If you're writing a form for a panel resource or relation manager, and you wish to check if a form is create, edit or view, use the $operation parameter:

function (string $operation) {
// ...
}

Outside the panel, you can set a form's operation by using the operation() method on the form definition.

Injecting multiple utilities

The parameters are injected dynamically using reflection, so you are able to combine multiple parameters in any order:

use Filament\Forms\Get;
use Filament\Forms\Set;
use Livewire\Component as Livewire;
 
function (Livewire $livewire, Get $get, Set $set) {
// ...
}

Injecting dependencies from Laravel's container

You may inject anything from Laravel's container like normal, alongside utilities:

use Filament\Forms\Set;
use Illuminate\Http\Request;
 
function (Request $request, Set $set) {
// ...
}

Field lifecycle

Each field in a form has a lifecycle, which is the process it goes through when the form is loaded, when it is interacted with by the user, and when it is submitted. You may customize what happens at each stage of this lifecycle using a function that gets run at that stage.

Field hydration

Hydration is the process that fills fields with data. It runs when you call the form's fill() method. You may customize what happens after a field is hydrated using the afterStateHydrated() method.

In this example, the name field will always be hydrated with the correctly capitalized name:

use Closure;
use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
 
TextInput::make('name')
->required()
->afterStateHydrated(function (TextInput $component, string $state) {
$component->state(ucwords($state));
})

As a shortcut for formatting the field's state like this when it is hydrated, you can use the formatStateUsing() method:

use Closure;
use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
 
TextInput::make('name')
->formatStateUsing(fn (string $state): string => ucwords($state))

Field updates

You may use the afterStateUpdated() method to customize what happens after a field is updated by the user. Only changes from the user on the frontend will trigger this function, not manual changes to the state from $set() or another PHP function.

Inside this function, you can also inject the $old value of the field before it was updated, using the $old parameter:

use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
 
TextInput::make('name')
->afterStateUpdated(function (?string $state, ?string $old) {
// ...
})

For an example of how to use this method, learn how to automatically generate a slug from a title.

Field dehydration

Dehydration is the process that gets data from the fields in your forms, and transforms it. It runs when you call the form's getState() method.

You may customize how the state is transformed when it is dehydrated using the dehydrateStateUsing() function. In this example, the name field will always be dehydrated with the correctly capitalized name:

use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
 
TextInput::make('name')
->required()
->dehydrateStateUsing(fn (string $state): string => ucwords($state))

Preventing a field from being dehydrated

You may also prevent a field from being dehydrated altogether using dehydrated(false). In this example, the field will not be present in the array returned from getState():

use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
 
TextInput::make('password_confirmation')
->password()
->dehydrated(false)

If your form auto-saves data to the database, like in a resource or table action, this is useful to prevent a field from being saved to the database if it is purely used for presentational purposes.

Reactive forms cookbook

This section contains a collection of recipes for common tasks you may need to perform when building an advanced form.

Conditionally hiding a field

To conditionally hide or show a field, you can pass a function to the hidden() method, and return true or false depending on whether you want the field to be hidden or not. The function can inject utilities as parameters, so you can do things like check the value of another field:

use Filament\Forms\Get;
use Filament\Forms\Components\Checkbox;
use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
 
Checkbox::make('is_company')
->live()
 
TextInput::make('company_name')
->hidden(fn (Get $get): bool => ! $get('is_company'))

In this example, the is_company checkbox is live(). This allows the form to rerender when the value of the is_company field changes. You can access the value of that field from within the hidden() function using the $get() utility. The value of the field is inverted using ! so that the company_name field is hidden when the is_company field is false.

Alternatively, you can use the visible() method to show a field conditionally. It does the exact inverse of hidden(), and could be used if you prefer the clarity of the code when written this way:

use Filament\Forms\Get;
use Filament\Forms\Components\Checkbox;
use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
 
Checkbox::make('is_company')
->live()
TextInput::make('company_name')
->visible(fn (Get $get): bool => $get('is_company'))

Conditionally making a field required

To conditionally make a field required, you can pass a function to the required() method, and return true or false depending on whether you want the field to be required or not. The function can inject utilities as parameters, so you can do things like check the value of another field:

use Filament\Forms\Get;
use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
 
TextInput::make('company_name')
->live(onBlur: true)
TextInput::make('vat_number')
->required(fn (Get $get): bool => filled($get('company_name')))

In this example, the company_name field is live(onBlur: true). This allows the form to rerender after the value of the company_name field changes and the user clicks away. You can access the value of that field from within the required() function using the $get() utility. The value of the field is checked using filled() so that the vat_number field is required when the company_name field is not null or an empty string. The result is that the vat_number field is only required when the company_name field is filled in.

Using a function is able to make any other validation rule dynamic in a similar way.

Generating a slug from a title

To generate a slug from a title while the user is typing, you can use the afterStateUpdated() method on the title field to $set() the value of the slug field:

use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
use Filament\Forms\Set;
use Illuminate\Support\Str;
 
TextInput::make('title')
->live()
->afterStateUpdated(fn (Set $set, ?string $state) => $set('slug', Str::slug($state)))
TextInput::make('slug')

In this example, the title field is live(). This allows the form to rerender when the value of the title field changes. The afterStateUpdated() method is used to run a function after the state of the title field is updated. The function injects the $set() utility and the new state of the title field. The Str::slug() utility method is part of Laravel and is used to generate a slug from a string. The slug field is then updated using the $set() function.

One thing to note is that the user may customize the slug manually, and we don't want to overwrite their changes if the title changes. To prevent this, we can use the old version of the title to work out if the user has modified it themselves. To access the old version of the title, you can inject $old, and to get the current value of the slug before it gets changed, we can use the $get() utility:

use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
use Filament\Forms\Get;
use Filament\Forms\Set;
use Illuminate\Support\Str;
 
TextInput::make('title')
->live()
->afterStateUpdated(function (Get $get, Set $set, ?string $old, ?string $state) {
if (($get('slug') ?? '') !== Str::slug($old)) {
return;
}
$set('slug', Str::slug($state));
})
TextInput::make('slug')

Dependant select options

To dynamically update the options of a select field based on the value of another field, you can pass a function to the options() method of the select field. The function can inject utilities as parameters, so you can do things like check the value of another field using the $get() utility:

use Filament\Forms\Get;
use Filament\Forms\Components\Select;
 
Select::make('category')
->options([
'web' => 'Web development',
'mobile' => 'Mobile development',
'design' => 'Design',
])
->live()
 
Select::make('sub_category')
->options(fn (Get $get): array => match ($get('category')) {
'web' => [
'frontend_web' => 'Frontend development',
'backend_web' => 'Backend development',
],
'mobile' => [
'ios_mobile' => 'iOS development',
'android_mobile' => 'Android development',
],
'design' => [
'app_design' => 'Panel design',
'marketing_website_design' => 'Marketing website design',
],
default => [],
})

In this example, the category field is live(). This allows the form to rerender when the value of the category field changes. You can access the value of that field from within the options() function using the $get() utility. The value of the field is used to determine which options should be available in the sub_category field. The match () statement in PHP is used to return an array of options based on the value of the category field. The result is that the sub_category field will only show options relevant to the selected category field.

You could adapt this example to use options loaded from an Eloquent model or other data source, by querying within the function:

use Filament\Forms\Get;
use Filament\Forms\Components\Select;
use Illuminate\Support\Collection;
 
Select::make('category')
->options(Category::query()->pluck('name', 'id'))
->live()
Select::make('sub_category')
->options(fn (Get $get): Collection => SubCategory::query()
->where('category', $get('category'))
->pluck('name', 'id'))

Dynamic fields based on a select option

You may wish to render a different set of fields based on the value of a field, like a select. To do this, you can pass a function to the schema() method of any layout component, which checks the value of the field and returns a different schema based on that value. Also, you will need a way to initialise the new fields in the dynamic schema when they are first loaded.

use Filament\Forms\Components\FileUpload;
use Filament\Forms\Components\Grid;
use Filament\Forms\Components\Select;
use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
use Filament\Forms\Get;
 
Select::make('type')
->options([
'employee' => 'Employee',
'freelancer' => 'Freelancer',
])
->live()
->afterStateUpdated(fn (Select $component) => $component
->getContainer()
->getComponent('dynamicTypeFields')
->getChildComponentContainer()
->fill())
Grid::make(2)
->schema(fn (Get $get): array => match ($get('type')) {
'employee' => [
TextInput::make('employee_number')
->required(),
FileUpload::make('badge')
->image()
->required(),
],
'freelancer' => [
TextInput::make('hourly_rate')
->numeric()
->required()
->prefix(''),
FileUpload::make('contract')
->required(),
],
default => [],
})
->key('dynamicTypeFields')

In this example, the type field is live(). This allows the form to rerender when the value of the type field changes. The afterStateUpdated() method is used to run a function after the state of the type field is updated. In this case, we inject the current select field instance, which we can then use to get the form "container" instance that holds both the select and the grid components. With this container, we can target the grid component using a unique key (dynamicTypeFields) that we have assigned to it. With that grid component instance, we can call fill(), just as we do on a normal form to initialise it. The schema() method of the grid component is then used to return a different schema based on the value of the type field. This is done by using the $get() utility, and returning a different schema array dynamically.

Auto-hashing password field

You have a password field:

use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
 
TextInput::make('password')
->password()

And you can use a dehydration function to hash the password when the form is submitted:

use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Hash;
 
TextInput::make('password')
->password()
->dehydrateStateUsing(fn (string $state): string => Hash::make($state))

But if your form is used to change an existing password, you don't want to overwrite the existing password if the field is empty. You can prevent the field from being dehydrated if the field is null or an empty string (using the filled() helper):

use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Hash;
 
TextInput::make('password')
->password()
->dehydrateStateUsing(fn (string $state): string => Hash::make($state))
->dehydrated(fn (?string $state): bool => filled($state))

However, you want to require the password to be filled when the user is being created, by injecting the $operation utility, and then conditionally making the field required:

use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Hash;
 
TextInput::make('password')
->password()
->dehydrateStateUsing(fn (string $state): string => Hash::make($state))
->dehydrated(fn (?string $state): bool => filled($state))
->required(fn (string $operation): bool => $operation === 'create')

Saving data to relationships

If you're building a form inside your Livewire component, make sure you have set up the form's model. Otherwise, Filament doesn't know which model to use to retrieve the relationship from.

As well as being able to give structure to fields, layout components are also able to "teleport" their nested fields into a relationship. Filament will handle loading data from a HasOne, BelongsTo or MorphOne Eloquent relationship, and then it will save the data back to the same relationship. To set this behaviour up, you can use the relationship() method on any layout component:

use Filament\Forms\Components\Fieldset;
use Filament\Forms\Components\FileUpload;
use Filament\Forms\Components\Textarea;
use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
 
Fieldset::make('Metadata')
->relationship('metadata')
->schema([
TextInput::make('title'),
Textarea::make('description'),
FileUpload::make('image'),
])

In this example, the title, description and image are automatically loaded from the metadata relationship, and saved again when the form is submitted. If the metadata record does not exist, it is automatically created.

This functionality is not just limited to fieldsets - you can use it with any layout component. For example, you could use a Group component which has no styling associated with it:

use Filament\Forms\Components\Group;
use Filament\Forms\Components\TextInput;
 
Group::make()
->relationship('customer')
->schema([
TextInput::make('name')
->label('Customer')
->required(),
TextInput::make('email')
->label('Email address')
->email()
->required(),
])

Inserting Livewire components into a form

You may use insert a Livewire component directly into a form:

use Filament\Forms\Components\Livewire;
use App\Livewire\Foo;
 
Livewire::make(Foo::class)

Passing parameters to a Livewire component

You can pass an array of parameters to a Livewire component:

use Filament\Forms\Components\Livewire;
use App\Livewire\Foo;
 
Livewire::make(Foo::class, ['bar' => 'baz'])

Now, those parameters will be passed to the Livewire component's mount() method:

class Foo extends Component
{
public function mount(string $bar): void
{
// ...
}
}

Alternatively, they will be available as public properties on the Livewire component:

class Foo extends Component
{
public string $bar;
}

Accessing the current record in the Livewire component

You can access the current record in the Livewire component using the $record parameter in the mount() method, or the $record property:

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;
 
class Foo extends Component
{
public function mount(?Model $record = null): void
{
// ...
}
// or
public ?Model $record = null;
}

Please be aware that when the record has not yet been created, it will be null. If you'd like to hide the Livewire component when the record is null, you can use the hidden() method:

use Filament\Forms\Components\Livewire;
use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;
 
Livewire::make(Foo::class)
->hidden(fn (?Model $record): bool => $record === null)

Lazy loading a Livewire component

You may allow the component to lazily load using the lazy() method:

use Filament\Forms\Components\Livewire;
use App\Livewire\Foo;
 
Livewire::make(Foo::class)->lazy()
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